Detroit Disassembled

Countdown to Gift Giving 2012: Day 13

detroit disassembled

Exhibition catalogues are a great way for you to both revisit your favorite exhibitions and share them with friends and family who may have missed them.

Detroit Disassembled: Photographs by Andrew Moore provides vivid reproductions of the images from the popular exhibition of the same name. Named one of the top picks for books in the 2010 New York Times Holiday Gift Guide, it is now in its third printing.

The Penland Book of Glass: Master Classes in Flamework Techniques offers stunning photographs, brilliant essays and systematic lessons from Paul Stankard and his Penland School of Crafts contemporaries.

Ray Turner: Population offers vibrant reproductions of the California artist’s oil paint on glass portraits of a wide cross- section of people from across the country. Included in the exhibition, featured at the museum during the first half of 2012, were portraits of University Park and downtown Akron residents

Pattern ID highlights a trend amongst contemporary artists to use pattern and dress as a language communicating who they are and where they come from. The catalogue features 15 artists of diverse origins who have seized on pattern and dress as powerful visual connectors between themselves, their histories and their audiences and includes work from the museum’s collection.

Also available are two catalogues of the autobiographical photography of Bea Nettles, whose work was on view at the museum earlier this year.

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Penland Book of Glass

Detroit Disassembled Opening Reception at Queens Museum of Art

Detroit DisassmbledAndrew Moore’s photographs of the Motor City are sublime—beautiful, operatic in scale and drama, tragic yet offering a glimmer of hope. They are the subject of Detroit Disassembled, an exhibition organized by the Akron Art Museum and currently on view at the Queens Museum of Art in New York.  On Sunday, September 18 the Queens Museum of Art is hosting an opening reception.

Spending three months in Detroit during 2008 and 2009, Moore found its citizens’ mood to be resilient and resourceful rather than tragic. The city is the ultimate case study for urban blight, an affliction that has infected most American cities, and for the survival of an industrial city in a post-industrial age.

Detroit Disassembled: Photographs by Andrew Moore has garnered national attention. In August 2011 Mike Rubin’s “Capturing the Idling of the Motor City” ran in the New York Times. In the preview Rubin wrote, “His large-scale prints—some up to 5 feet by 6 feet – are sumptuous and painterly, rich in texture and color: the emerald carpet of moss growing on the floor of Henry Ford’s office at the Model T plant, the pumpkin-orange walls of a vandalized classroom at Cass Technical High School, the crimson panels of a former F.B.I. shooting range.”

In addition to the national attention the exhibition has received, the exhibition book “Detroit Disassembled” is now in its third printing and essayist Philip Levine was recently named the Poet Laureate of the United States. “Detroit Disassembled” is available for purchase in the Museum Store.

This exhibition is organized by the Akron Art Museum and made possible by a major gift from Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell with additional support from the John A. McAlonan Fund of Akron Community Foundation.  The accompanying publication is underwritten by Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell with additional funding from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation.

The presentation of this exhibition at the Queens Museum of Art is made possible through the generosity of the Charina Endowment Fund and The Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation.

Detroit Disassembled: Photographs by Andrew Moore

Detroit Disassembled:

Photographs by Andrew Moore

June 5, 2010 – October 10, 2010

Arnstein, Bidwell and Isroff Galleries

Andrew Moore’s photographs of the Motor City are sublime—beautiful, operatic in scale and drama, tragic yet offering a glimmer of hope. They are the subject of Detroit Disassembled, an exhibition organized by the Akron Art Museum making its debut here before touring nationally. Detroit, once the epitome of our nation’s industrial wealth and might, has been in decline for almost a half-century. The city is now one-third empty land—more abandoned property than any American city except post-Katrina New Orleans.

Moore’s images, printed on the scale of epic history paintings, belong to an artistic tradition that began in the 17th century. Numerous artists have used ruins to remind their viewers of the fall of past great civilizations and to warn that contemporary empires risk the same fate. Moore’s soaring scenes of rusting factory halls and crumbling theaters share the monumentality of Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s 18th century engravings of the fallen civic monuments of ancient Rome and Greece. His photographs of skeletal houses and collapsed churches carry forward the Romantic tone and rich hues of Caspar David Friedrich’s 19th century paintings of fallen medieval cathedrals and castles. Although hard to believe that Moore’s post-apocalyptic scenes reflect present-day America, he has been scrupulously honest, creating photographs that are both documentary and metaphorical in nature.

This exhibition is organized by the Akron Art Museum and made possible by a major gift from Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell with additional support from the John A. McAlonan Fund of Akron Community Foundation. The accompanying publication is underwritten by Fred and Laura Ruth Bidwell with additional funding from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation.

The Opening Party is supported by a generous gift from Mr. and Mrs. Robert Weisberger.